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Top U.S. cybercrimes include more than just data breach, phishing

April 3, 2019

 
The top reported cybercrime in the U.S. in 2017 was the nonpayment or delivery of a good ordered over the internet.

 

The ability to be connected to the internet is virtually everywhere. For better or for worse, our devices, homes, cars and even toys are now designed with internet connectivity in mind. While these developments have many positive aspects, it’s the negative aspects that are often not considered enough.

 

Cybercriminals, on the other hand, are considering them extensively and finding new ways to exploit users for their data and financial resources. Some types of cybercrimes are well-known, but the ones most frequently reported to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) also include cybercrimes that are not often spotlighted.

Related: What insurers need to know about the downside of ‘IoT’

 

Top cybercrimes in the U.S.

 

As many businesses focus their efforts on the internet and online shopping, the top reported cybercrime in the U.S. directly correlates: In 2017, there were 84,079 victims of the nonpayment or delivery of a good ordered over the internet. Personal data breach (30,904) and phishing/vishing/smishing/pharming (25,344) rounded out the top three.

But cybercriminals employ an array of tactics on unsuspecting individuals. There were 14,938 victims of extortion, 10,949 victims to those falsely claiming to offer tech support and 1,300 victims of crimes against children.

 

Other tactics include confidence/romance fraud, lottery/sweepstakes, government impersonation and terrorism, among others.

 

“As cyber criminals become more sophisticated in their efforts to target victims, we must continue to transform and develop in order to address the persistent and evolving cyber threats we face,” writes Scott S. Smith, assistant director of the cyber division at the FBI.

 

Courtesy of: Denny Jacob is a staff reporter for PropertyCasualty360.com

 

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